Health advisory in Northern California for rising RSV and flu cases

Health advisory in Northern California for rising RSV and flu cases

Northern California health officials said Wednesday they are reporting an increase in both RSV and flu cases in the region. “We’re also seeing a higher-than-average daily census increase for this time of year and seeing complications from RSV,” Dr. Zoey Goore of Kaiser Permanente said at a news conference with medical experts around the world on Wednesday. Sacramento County. “We’re also seeing some pretty significant complications from the flu.” RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus, is spiking across the country. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that most children get RSV sometime before they are two years old. “Virtually all children contract RSV between the ages of zero and three, and if you think about the last two and a half years of mitigation efforts in place we saw record low numbers of RSV, influenza and other respiratory viruses,” said Dr. Dean Blumberg of UC Davis Health. Symptoms can resemble a common cold and include a runny nose, decreased appetite, cough, sneezing, fever, and wheezing. They usually last a week or two and go away with rest and fluids. But in some children, especially young babies, RSV can be dangerous, causing dehydration, shortness of breath, and more serious illnesses, such as bronchiolitis or pneumonia. Video below | What is RSV and how do you detect it in your child? Health officials said there is a significant increase in emergency room visits and hospital admissions with children who have RSV. However, Blumberg said they are not seeing the same levels that the East Coast is seeing where there are not enough hospital beds for children. He warned that things can “change quickly”. “We’ve been watching this progression coming from the East Coast for several weeks and we’ve put a lot of practices in place ahead of time,” said Craig Swanson, MD, of Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento Children’s Center. Doctors representing different health systems around the world. All of Northern California echoed that they are working to increase capacity at all hospitals in the region to care for children during this time. “I can’t give you a specific number for the increase in admissions, but we’re definitely seeing more consultations, definitely more patient admissions. Dignity (Health) and Mercy San Juan are prepared to expand our pediatric beds that we currently have so we’re doing what best we can to accommodate this surge that we’re seeing,” said Dr. Lindsey Demetral, of Mercy San Juan Medical Center Dignity Health. Older than normal children get RSVRSV, generally affecting children six months of age or younger more often due to lower immune system support. However, toddlers and kindergarten-age children are the ones who need respiratory support the most right now, Demetral said. vigilant with COVID-19. “That means all of those kids weren’t able to get RSV for the first time and so these older little kids are getting RSV and I think that’s what’s driving some of the older kids to go to the hospital with complications. Blumberg said. Health officials have warned that children with asthma are at higher risk of complications from RSV. Influenza cases also increased across the country. So far this season, there have been an estimated 1.6 million cases of influenza and 13,000 hospitalizations. Flu activity is most intense in some of the areas where RSV is fading, including the Southeast, according to CDC data. Health officials are urging people to get a flu shot now, ahead of the usually busy sick season. “All children who have been hospitalized with complications from the flu have not yet received the flu vaccine this year,” Goore said. There is no RSV vaccine yet. | Video below | Flu season is more aggressive now compared to the last decade, CNN contributed to this report.

Northern California health officials said Wednesday they are reporting an increase in both RSV and flu cases in the region.

“We’re also seeing a higher-than-average daily census increase for this time of year and seeing complications from RSV,” Dr. Zoey Goore of Kaiser Permanente said at a news conference with medical experts around the world on Wednesday. Sacramento County. “We’re also seeing some pretty significant complications from the flu.”

RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus, is spiking across the country.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that most children get RSV sometime before the age of two.

“Virtually all children contract RSV between the ages of zero and three, and if you think about the last two and a half years of mitigation efforts, we saw record low numbers of RSV, influenza and other respiratory viruses,” said Dr. Dean Blumberg of UC Davis Health.

Symptoms can resemble a common cold and include a runny nose, decreased appetite, cough, sneezing, fever, and wheezing. They usually last a week or two and go away with rest and fluids.

But in some children, especially young babies, RSV can be dangerous, causing dehydration, shortness of breath, and more serious illnesses, such as bronchiolitis or pneumonia.

| Video below | What is RSV and how do you detect it in your child?

Health officials said there is a significant increase in emergency room visits and hospital admissions with children who have RSV. However, Blumberg said they are not seeing the same levels that the East Coast is seeing, where there are not enough hospital beds for children.

He warned that things can “change quickly”.

“We’ve been watching this progression coming from the East Coast for several weeks and we’ve put a lot of practices in place ahead of time,” said Craig Swanson, MD, of Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento Children’s Center.

Doctors representing different health systems in Northern California echoed that they are working to increase capacity at all hospitals in the region to care for children during this time.

“I can’t give you a specific number for the increase in admissions, but we’re definitely seeing more consultations, definitely more patient admissions. Dignity (Health) and Mercy San Juan are prepared to expand our pediatric beds that we currently have so we’re doing what best we can to accommodate this surge that we’re seeing,” said Dr. Lindsey Demetral, of Mercy San Juan Medical Center Dignity Health.

Older children get RSV

RSV usually affects children who are six months of age or younger more often due to less support from the immune system. However, toddlers and kindergarten-age children are the ones who need respiratory support the most right now, Demetral said.

She said it’s probably because young children weren’t exposed to RSV with children who weren’t in school, more people were wearing masks and more vigilant with COVID-19.

“That means all of those kids weren’t able to get RSV for the first time and so these older little kids are getting RSV and I think that’s what’s driving some of the older kids to go to the hospital with complications. Blumberg said.

Health officials have warned that children with asthma are at higher risk of complications from RSV.

Flu cases also increase across the country

So far this season, there have been an estimated 1.6 million flu cases and 13,000 hospitalizations. Flu activity is most intense in some of the areas where RSV is fading, including the Southeast, according to CDC data.

Health officials are urging people to get a flu shot now, ahead of the usually busy sick season.

“All children who have been hospitalized with complications from the flu have not yet received the flu vaccine this year,” Goore said.

There is no RSV vaccine yet.

| Video below | More aggressive flu season now compared to the last decade


-CNN contributed to this report.

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