The role of social networks in the spread of harmful medical knowledge

The role of social networks in the spread of harmful medical knowledge

The repercussions of the information age have caused the outbreak of a new type of epidemic: an epidemic of medical and health misinformation, which has conquered social networks. Concerns about theseinfodemic” of unsubstantiated and potentially harmful medical advice jumped to the forefront of national news recently due to a recent social media sensation surrounding the drug. Ozempic. Designed to treat type 2 diabetes, the prescription drug has been credited with staggering “weight loss success” and the track “Ozempic” has racked up more than 300 million views on TikTok.

As a result, doctors have been inundated with requests for the drug, prompting extreme market shortage. The situation now poses problems for patients with type 2 diabetes, as the increased demand for the drug without brand use has made it increasingly difficult to acquire for those who really need it. Novo NordiskOzempic’s maker, issued a statement on the rise in unapproved use of the drug, saying: “We do not promote, suggest or encourage the unauthorized use of our drugs.”

And indeed, such unconventional use of the drug can lead to serious health complications. Their website lists possible side effectsincluding kidney failure, pancreatitis, thyroid tumors, and gallbladder problems. Not to mention, at a hefty cost of nearly $900 a month, potential health repercussions aren’t the only price potential users of the drug will have to pay. Considering all this, the question remains: Why do people keep buying the narrative?

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