Social media influencers promote injecting and snorting the dangerous ‘Barbie drug’

Social media influencers promote injecting and snorting the dangerous ‘Barbie drug’

Skerritt said there has been an increase in posts promoting drug abuse on social media platforms. He also said the regulator was considering taking action against companies that sell melanotan through links in social media posts.

A video posted on TikTok shows a young woman using a nasal spray and the words: “A nasal spray a day keeps the paleness away.”

Another video shows a young man saying that he had experienced side effects from using melanotan and felt “like dog shit, but it was worth it.” “Do your own research,” he said. “It has its negative aspects. I love this m—”.

Famed facialist Ingrid Seaburn said she had warned clients

Famed facialist Ingrid Seaburn said she had warned “curious” clients of her Bondi-based skin health studio about the risks of melanotan.Credit:nikki short

British doctor Sophie Shotter also posted a video on TikTok warning of the “potentially lethal” consequences of using a nasal spray to inhale melanotan.

“This trend that I’m seeing everywhere on TikTok right now for these nasal tanning sprays is very concerning,” he said.

shooter said The Herald of the Sun Y the sunday era she had seen patients who had used nasal tanning sprays with “no concept of the potential for any harm, and who are appalled that they have now realized this.”

A TikTok spokeswoman said in a statement that videos promoting or selling nasal tanning sprays and melanotan violated the platform’s rules and had been removed.

“We have also banned labels like #tannasalspray #melanotan and #melanotan2,” he said.

In Australia, more than 660,000 TikTok videos were removed in the last three months for violating its guidelines, it said. “The safety of our community is a top priority for TikTok.”

The director of the Center for Healthy Societies at the University of Sydney, Stephanie Raymond, coined the term “melotanners” as part of her PhD research to describe people who inject melanotan.

Charging

She said the self-tanners ranged in age from 18 to 60 and included students and professionals who “traded” the risk of sun exposure by injecting an unregulated substance.

Australasian College of Dermatologists Fellow Dr Jo-Ann See said she was concerned about how many people might be influenced by videos on social media recommending DIY beauty trends.

“Sometimes due diligence is not done regarding the safety or efficacy of what is recommended,” he said.

Ingrid Seaburn, a Los Angeles-based former celebrity facialist, said she had warned “curious” clients of her Bondi-based skin health studio about the risks of melanotan, noting that “the only safe tan was a fake tan.

Charging

“Only one or two have tried it and reported experiencing redness of the face, so it sometimes looks redder, as well as increased pigment shades in freckles and moles,” he said.

Seaburn said many worrying beauty trends were being promoted on TikTok, including applications of artificial freckles that had the potential to cause scarring or infection.

Slater and Gordon public liability attorney Lily Boskovski said social media platforms should be dominating companies advertising unsafe products, “but instead, they’re taking advantage of a bunch of young people.”

“Social media platforms, such as TikTok and Instagram, should have an ethical obligation to provide information that is accurate and does not harm young people who can be easily influenced to buy an unregulated product so quickly online,” he said.

Charging

In June, The Herald of the Sun Y the sunday era reported that a Life-Saving Prescription-Only Diabetes Drug Ozempic was in short supply after social media users touted it as a weight-loss drug.

Social media influencers have also been fighting a ban. imposed in February by the TGA on receiving cash or samples for beauty product promotions on social media platforms.

Videos have also been posted on TikTok showing DIY “needle-free” lip fillers and DIY dermaplaning or face shaving.

Boskovski said that risky treatments that are not performed correctly and safely by a professional who has received the proper training can do more harm than good: “There have been cases of people who have suffered burns and other injuries that may require corrective surgeries.”

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