Analysis of the use of teprotumumab-trbw shows that a small percentage of patients receive a second cycle of treatment

Analysis of the use of teprotumumab-trbw shows that a small percentage of patients receive a second cycle of treatment

Horizon Therapeutics plc has announced new data from a real-world analysis of teprotumumab-trbw (Tepezza) presented at the 91st Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association.

According to the company, teprotumumab-trbw is the first and only drug approved by the FDA for the treatment of thyroid eye disease (TED), a rare, serious, progressive and life-threatening autoimmune disease of vision.1

Evidence has indicated that due to the progressive nature of TED, the disease may reactivate or recur. In a retrospective chart review, up to 15% of patients experienced a TED flare, regardless of treatment regimen. While many causes of flare are unknown, some triggers include pregnancy, stress, and surgery.two

The real-world analysis evaluated de-identified claims data from people living with TED who completed a full, uninterrupted course of teprotumumab-trbw (8 infusions) in 2020 and were then prescribed a second course of treatment before July 2022. During this two cycle one year period, 4.9% (286/5845) of patients were prescribed a second course of teprotumumab-trb. 1.9% (110/5,845) of the total number of patients started treatment at the end of the two-year period, with a mean time of 12 months between cycles.3

“Treating an autoimmune condition like thyroid eye disease that can worsen or exacerbate over time is challenging,” said Shoaib Ugradar, MD, The Jules Stein Eye Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). “These data indicate that the need for additional treatment with Tepezza is low for those with thyroid eye disease who have completed initial treatment. With continued analysis and research, we hope to get closer to identifying causes and specific indicators for further treatment to better manage this debilitating lifelong condition.”

Horizon also announced the results of a 2018 survey of US endocrinologists and ophthalmologists that compared the impact of shorter versus longer duration TED in patients with a high clinical activity score (CAS). The analysis looked at those with a CAS ≥ 3, who had lived with SDT for less than or equal to three years (n = 192) versus more than three years (n = 115). The shorter and longer duration groups reported a comparable negative impact on overall mental health (38.5% vs. 35.7%, respectively) and experience with anxiety and depression. Both also reported a similar negative effect of TED on their quality of life, as measured by a seven-point Likert scale, which includes social and daily activities.4

“Thyroid eye disease, regardless of how many years have passed since diagnosis, can significantly affect a person’s ability to look and feel like themselves and can affect daily tasks, from reading to driving a car,” Jeffrey W. Sherman, MD, FACP, Executive Vice President, Chief Medical Officer, Horizon, said in the news release. “The results of this survey emphasize the burden of disease for those living with thyroid eye disease and underscore the need for appropriate care with treatment as soon as possible.”

References

  1. Barrio-Barrio J, et al. Graves’ ophthalmopathy: VISA versus EUGOGO classification, evaluation, and management. Journal of Ophthalmopathy. 2015;2015:249125.
  2. Patel P, et al. Recurrent thyroid eye disease. Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2015; 31:445-8.
  3. Smith TJ, et al. Evaluation of patients with thyroid eye disease from the United States receiving an additional course of teprotumumab treatment for 2 years. Poster session presented at: American Thyroid Association (ATA) Annual Conference; 2022 October 19-23; Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
  4. Smith TJ, et al. Sequelae of inflammatory thyroid eye disease of shorter versus longer duration. Poster session presented at: American Thyroid Association (ATA) Annual Conference; 2022 October 19-23; Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

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