A cure for baldness could be on the horizon as Japanese researchers generate mature hair follicles in the lab

A cure for baldness could be on the horizon as Japanese researchers generate mature hair follicles in the lab

Scientists in Japan have successfully grown mature hair follicles in a laboratory, something the researchers hope could eventually lead to effective results. baldness treatments and other conditions.

A team of scientists from jYokohama National University of Apan published the study in the journal Science Advances on Friday.

His journal article, titled “Reprogramming Three-Dimensional Microenvironments for Hair Follicle Induction in Vitro,” described his use of mouse embryonic cells to create a hair follicle that grew 3 mm (approximately 0.12 inches) over 23 days.

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The scientists he said in a news release that he believed his research “could prove valuable for a better understanding of hair follicle induction, for evaluating hair pigmentation and hair growth drugs, and for regenerating hair follicles.”

The new developments from Japan marked the first time a mature hair follicle had been grown in a laboratory, the researchers said.

The new developments from Japan marked the first time a mature hair follicle had been grown in a laboratory, the researchers said.
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“Our next step is to use cells of human origin and apply for drug development and regenerative medicine,” Junji Fukuda, professor and faculty member of engineering at Yokohama National University, said in the statement.

The study marked the first time a mature hair follicle had been grown in a laboratory, they noted.

“This new understanding of how cells interact may have far more important implications for understanding and correcting defects in other tissues…”

While the development has “great potential” for people with baldness, there are other reasons to be excited about this research, said Dr. Michael Kinch, a cell biologist and cancer researcher based at the Long Island University Biotechnology Research Innovation Center, he told Fox News Digital via email.

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“This new understanding of how cells interact may have much larger implications for understanding and correcting defects in other tissues that contain similar types of cells,” said Dr. Kinch, who was not involved in the research, “ranging from diabetes ( where similar interactions control insulin production) to cancer”.

Kinch said he had studied the roles of epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions earlier in his career, and “a better understanding of these relationships will likely determine the potential that cancer could arisewhich could lead to better cancer progression.

This, however, will take a considerable amount of time. “The field is progressing, but not fast enough,” she said.

"This research shows how far we have come with embryonic cell manipulation and the breadth of medical applications this technology can have." said an internist in the Washington, DC area.

“This research shows how far we’ve come with manipulating embryonic cells and the variety of medical applications this technology can have,” said an internist in the Washington, DC area.
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Dr. Ken Zweig, an assistant professor of medicine at Georgetown University and George Washington University Schools of Medicine in Washington, DC, told Fox News Digital: “The research is interesting, but I think we’re a long way from This is a cost.” -effective application”.

He added: “The use of stem cells is controversial and expensive, which limits their widespread availability in the short term.”

Zweig also noted, “In addition, we already have relatively cheap, safe, and somewhat effective treatments for hair loss, including Rogaine, Propecia, and hair transplants.”

“Other advances in hair growth have shown promise.”

However, he also said, “The technology is very exciting: this research shows how far we have come with manipulating embryonic cells and the breadth of medical applications this technology can have.”

Molecule microinjection

While lab-created hair follicles are likely years away from reaching a bald person’s head, as the researchers point out, other advances in hair growth have shown promise.

A microinjection of a molecule called “SCUBE3” triggered hair growth in mice that had dormant hair follicles, according to Researchers at the University of California, Irvinewho published their findings in the medical journal Developmental Cell in June.

The molecule even worked in human hair follicles that had been grafted onto mice, the study reported.

However, like lab-grown follicles, it will likely be years before humans can receive these treatments.

Medications for hair loss.

One thing that is currently available, albeit without FDA approval for hair loss, is a pill form of the drug Minoxidil.

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Although minoxidil is FDA-approved for topical use to prevent hair loss, scientists discovered years ago that a low-dose oral version of the drug is also effective in preventing hair loss and stimulating hair growth, The New York Times in 2018. .

Minoxidil is the active ingredient in Rogaine, a hair loss drug that has been approved by the FDA since the late 1980s.

For many men, hair loss is tied to masculinity issues, according to esthetic nurse practitioner Wendy Vaughn.

For many men, hair loss is tied to masculinity issues, according to esthetic nurse practitioner Wendy Vaughn.
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A study involving high-dose oral minoxidil for high blood pressure resulted in many patients also reporting increased hair growth, they noted.

Additionally, a 2017 study published in the International Journal of Dermatology found that “once-daily capsules containing minoxidil 0.25 mg and spironolactone [a diuretic] 25 mg appears to be safe and effective in the treatment of “female pattern hair loss”.

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Dr. Rodney D. Sinclair, a professor of dermatology at the University of Melbourne, found that of the 100 women in the study, only eight experienced “generally mild” side effects.

Of those eight, only two chose to discontinue treatment, according to the study.

‘Tied to masculinity’

There’s more to baldness than just losing hair, Wendy Vaughan, a Woburn, Massachusetts-based aesthetic nurse practitioner, told Fox News Digital via email.

for many mentheir hair “is tied to their masculinity,” she said, while some women with thinning hair “feel self-conscious and feel the need to try to address the problem.”

Treatments like lab-grown follicles would be a “game changer” for those who are bothered by thinning hair, he said.

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Vaughan cautioned that existing hair loss treatments can sometimes have serious side effects.

“The active ingredient in Propecia (finasteride) has the ability to block the hormone responsible for male pattern baldness, but it can also have some harmful effects related to a man’s sexual health,” he said.

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“Most commonly,” he said, is “loss of libido and erectile dysfunction.”

Amy McGorry contributed to this article.

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